Sleep Tight: Tech and How We’re Sacrificing Sleep

At New Jammies, we’re always cognizant of how electronics are affecting us and our children. Especially with kids headed back to school. The National Sleep Foundation’s latest Sleep Health Index (SHI) shows significant associations between technology use in bed and sleep health.

“Forty-eight percent of American adults reported using a device like a computer, tablet, or smartphone in bed before trying to go to sleep,” the NSF reports. “These people averaged two points lower on the overall SHI (75 vs. 77, on a 1 to 100 scale) and five points lower on the sleep quality subindex (65 vs. 70) than those who refrained from technology use in bed.”

Even more eye-opening, the Foundation found that 21% of American adults (52 million people) reported awakening from sleep and using an electronic device before trying to go back to sleep at least once in the past seven days.

“These individuals averaged 10 points lower for overall sleep health and 13 points lower on the sleep quality subindex than others (68 vs. 78, and 57 vs. 70, respectively),” according to the NSF. “Additionally, about 43% of these people reported sending a text or email after awakening. This means that 9% of American adults made the decision to engage with technology when awakening in the middle of the night, rather than trying to fall back asleep.

In short, electronics are changing our sleep patterns, and not necessarily in a positive way.

“The Sleep Health Index shows that bedtime electronics use is a problem. We can’t know if this use of tech is a cause of poor sleep health or a result of it,” says David Cloud, CEO of the National Sleep Foundation. “It is clear, however, that if you are having trouble sleeping, you should stay away from using technology while in bed.”

According to the American Sleep Association, sleep loss from using electronic devices before bed occurs from light coming from the screen of your device that interferes with circadian rhythms and melatonin production.

“The circadian rhythm is the internal clock that controls our biological patterns such as body temperature, blood pressure, and hormone release, and has a lot to do with how we sleep,” the Association says, in its report on sleep and electronics by Kristina Diaz, a Registered Respiratory Therapist and a health and wellness enthusiast and writer. “Circadian rhythm is affected by light, time, and melatonin production. Light and darkness tell us when to feel awake or sleepy.”

Diaz notes that time affects this cycle because we are clock readers and follow schedules to which our bodies have become adapted.

“Melatonin, a hormone secreted in the brain by the pineal gland, induces the tired feeling. This hormone helps keep our sleep-wake cycles on track,” Diaz says. “The light emitted from our devices, even just from a cell phone, passes through the retina of the eye, causing a delay in the release of melatonin making it harder to fall asleep.”

In regards to children and technology, kids are especially susceptible to having difficulty failing sleep wit’s electronics.

“Many children are now given an electronic device, such as an iPad or television to soothe and relax them before bed, but this is actually doing more harm than good,” the American Sleep Association says. “Children need sufficient sleep for growth, learning, mood, creativity, and weight control. But children who use electronics before bed tend to have later bedtimes, get fewer hours of sleep, and because of this suffer from daytime sleepiness more than children that do not use these devices before bed.”

This is also true for adolescents and teenagers, who not only use these devices for entertainment purposes, but also for homework, says the ASA.

“Using electronics before bed also stimulates our mind by getting our brains ‘fired up,'” the ASA says. “Electrical activity then increases and neurons start to race, making it difficult to sleep”

With electronics becoming such as big part of our daily lives, this begs the question of how we can improve sleep. Diaz advises just unplugging or turning off.

“Even going just 15-30 minutes electronic free before bedtime can make a difference. Make your bedroom completely device-free, including the television,” she suggests. “For children, refrain from giving them the iPad or letting them watch their T.V. shows, and have them read a book instead. It may not be easy at first to make this change since we have become so dependent on technology, but you will be happy when you are waking up feeling much more rested.”

For bedtime reading ideas, see our blog on New Children’s Books Perfect for Bedtime.

New Jammies was born as an environmentally responsible company offering 100% certified organic cotton and flame retardant-free children’s pajamas. Learn more at newjammies.com.

Sleep Tight: Surviving Baby’s Sleep Regression

It’s the question New Jammies moms and dads hear once consistently when their babies reach at least three months.

Does he sleep through the night yet?

Just when parents can confidently answer yes, it seems, sleep regression makes sleeping through the night seem like a distant memory. What exactly is sleep regression again?

According to babysleepsite.com, sleep regression is described as “a period of time (anywhere from 1-4 weeks) when a baby or toddler who has been sleeping well suddenly starts waking at night, and/or skipping naps (or waking early from naps) for no apparent reason.”

“Parents often describe being caught totally off guard: you think your have conquered all your little one’s sleep challenges, when suddenly, out of nowhere, you’re back to constant night wakings and nonexistent naps,” says the website.

In the babysleepsite.com article “4-Month Sleep Regression Explained (sometimes 3 and 5 months too),” it notes that changes that happen with the 4-month sleep regression are permanent changes.

“By 4 months, your baby has ditched her babyish sleeping patterns and is sleeping more like an adult – and that translates into frequent night waking (and lots of fussing) along with shortened naps.”

New Jammies Classic Stripes Sleep Sacks

Changes in sleep can also happen at 8-10 months and 11 or 12 and 18 months, and even at 2 years old, and beyond. The “Sleep Regressions: Everything You Need to Know” article’s author, Emily DeJeu, says the key to coping and moving past sleep regression is to “know the what, the why, and the when behind common baby and toddler sleep regression – now how about the ‘how to’? As in, “How the heck do I fix this and get back to my peaceful nights of sleep again?!?!”

“Well, for starters, remember that the 4-month sleep regression is a permanent change – there is no going back to the way things were,” DeJeu writes. “Once you are through the worst of the 4-month sleep regression you will want to focus on helping your baby break her sleep associations, and on heaping her learn to fall asleep without help from you. Once she can do that, she will be well on her way to sleeping through the night, and establishing a more predictable daytime schedule.”

For mom-of-two Nicole Ludlow, New Jammies founder and CEO, she found herself up every night with one child or the other just last week for various reasons. Her 3-year-old often kicks his sheets off at night, then is cold or wakes and is afraid of the dark.

“I just ordered him a nightlight because the one we had wouldn’t stay on all night,” she said.

Her younger 16-month-old used to wake for a bottle after she stopped nursing, but now she can mostly just change his diaper and he will go back to sleep.

“Last night both kids slept through the night. Overall I would say they are good sleepers, just those quick wake-ups when they need comforting disrupts my good sleep,” she adds. “I am finding daytime naps sometimes seem to help them sleep better at night.”

Nicole says she always tries to determine what is really the cause of any sleep change, especially if it has to do with teething.

“We can usually tell before bed if it’s his teeth and he is really fussy,” she says. “If teething is causing extra fussiness, we usually look for signs like rubbing face and putting hands in mouth, and then check his gums. If it looks like one is coming through I will give him the recommended dose of Tylenol before bed. It’s pretty rare, but helps on occasion.”

For free resources from the Baby Sleep Site, click here.

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New Jammies was born as an environmentally responsible company offering 100% certified organic cotton and flame retardant-free children’s pajamas. Learn more at newjammies.com.

Sleep Tight: Back-to-School Sleep Habits

 

New Jammies is getting ready for back to school, helping kids with nighttime gear in our fun, 100% organic cotton pajamas. Plus we have some great tips on a good night’s sleep for back to school.

This school year features updates on sleep recommendations for kids by the American Academy of Pediatrics, through recommendations developed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. The consensus group of 13 sleep medicine experts and researchers recommend:

• Infants 4 to 12 months – 12 to 16 hours of sleep every 24 hours (including naps).*

• Children 1 to 2 years – 11 to 14 hours of sleep every 24 hours (including naps).

• Children 3 to 5 years – 10 to 13 hours of sleep every 24 hours (including naps).

• Children 6 to 12 years – 9 to 12 hours of sleep every 24 hours.

• Teens 13 to 18 years – 8 to 10 hours of sleep every 24 hours.

*Recommendations for babies younger than 4 months not reported because of the wide range normalcy in sleep patterns in newborns, and there isn’t enough research to back up guidance in the youngest of infants.

Other sleep recommendations that remain consistent as kids return to school is to go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day, and avoid blue light emitted from phones, tablets, and computers at night. That can be said for kids as well as adults.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that babies, toddlers, and younger children should have a regular, structured bedtime routine, including reading books together and brushing teeth, as well as going to bed at the same time every evening.

The academy also suggests the 4 B’s of Bedtime to best prepare for a proper night’s sleep. ​​​

“The reality of habits is that (a) they can be hard to break and (b) they are not always bad. Take away one habit and you often need to find something to take its place,” says the AAP. In the case of the bedtime breast or bottle, be reassured that we don’t intend to leave you empty-handed once you take away your baby’s primary source of bedtime comfort.”

These 4 B’s of Bedtime offer a soothing substitute proven to be one of the AAP’s most tried-and-true routines for bedtime success — both for babies and older children.

• Bathing. Baths are a soothing, hygienic, and decisive way of separating the evening’s eating activities from sleeping. No way around it — only the unbelievably fatigued child will sleep his way through a bath. That means that when feeding time is over, your child will get the message that eating is not in any way, shape, or form a cue to go to sleep.

• Brushing. Whether you choose to brush your child’s teeth (or gums) right after the last feeding or just before the actual bedtime itself, we strongly encourage you to get in the habit of having a toothbrush (or washcloth or gauze) be the last thing in your baby’s mouth at night (other than, perhaps, a clean pacifier during the first year as an added method of sudden infant death syndrome prevention).

• Books. We’ve found nothing more suitable as a breast/bottle stand-in than books at bedtime. Since you don’t want food or drink to become your child’s bedtime source of comfort, books can serve as the perfect cue that it’s time to cuddle up and go to sleep. Think about what happens when you’re tired and you try to read?

• Bingo—you fall asleep. When it comes to lifelong healthy habits, we can’t think of a better one.
Bedtime. Short of drugging kids (which we don’t condone, no matter how tired or tempted you might be), it’s mighty hard to force a child to fall asleep. We suggest you stop trying and instead stick to implementing a routine time for your child to get ready for and get into bed. Once you’ve set the stage so that bathing, brushing, and books signal bedtime, you should just let your child fall asleep independently. Sure, this may involve some additional challenges, protests, and even the need to consult additional parenting resources (of which, we can assure you, there are many), but in the end we have always found that if you do a good job of making the bed, your child will learn to lie in it.

New Jammies Sleep Sacks

New Jammies Sleep Sacks

Sleep Tight to Summer’s End

Gearing up for back to school takes plenty of rest, so help those little ones sleep tight through the night while their big brothers and sisters make the most of the end-of-summer sun. Through August 15, enjoy 20% off Sleep Sacks and Toddler Footies for a great night’s sleep. Our Classic Stripes sleep sacks, seen here, are a popular print this season. Shop online for Sleep Sacks and Toddler Footies today and receive 20% off (code? DREAM056).

Sleep Tight: Outfitting Baby for Long Winter’s Nights

New Jammies Sleep SacksIn 2012, Time Magazine ran a story about safe-sleeping sacks that were becoming popular in U.S. hospitals, inspired by the passing of Bill Schmid’s daughter, Haley, of SIDS. At the time, Schmid had developed a sleeveless zip-up sleep bag to replace blankets, and the popularity of this safe-sleeping option was gaining momentum. The article noted that his sleep sack invention had become so mainstream, the baby apparel was being sold everywhere from Target to Pottery Barn. And now, New Jammies.

New Jammies heard the call for safe-sleeping baby wear in its own collections. And answered. Last spring, we launched our popular sleeveless sleep sacks to keep babies safe and warm in the wintertime and cool in the warmer months.

The idea to offer sleep sacks came about as New Jammies owner and founder Nicole Ludlow, mother of a new baby herself, become interested in the safety of sleeveless zip-up bags for resting babies.

“I wanted to carry a collection of durable sleep sacks that encouraged my baby to sleep on his back until he could comfortably roll over from back or tummy,” she says. “And eliminate loose crib blankets for the prevention of SIDS.”

New Jammies Butterfly Magic Sleep SackLudlow designed a New Jammies sleep sack that’s offered in double-layered, 100% organic cotton to be warm, breathable and cozy. Sizes come in small (3-6 months, 10-18 pounds) and medium (6-18 months, 16-24 pounds).

“They fit perfectly over footie pajamas for cool evenings or can be paired with onesies for warmer nights,” she says.

According to Nancy Maruyama, RN, an infant’s sleep environment plays a large role in safe sleep. In her article titled, “Tips for Safe Sleeping: Newborns and Babies” on pregnancy.org, Maruyama says SIDS deaths are most likely to occur when babies are between the ages of 2 months and 4 months, and deaths tend to peak in winter months.

“It is the leading cause of death in babies 1 month to 1 year old,” she reports.

Strategies featured in the article for lowering SIDS risk includes the notion that the only safe bedding for baby is no bedding.

“Layer clothing on baby for warmth instead of layering blankets,” says the article. “Baby’s face should never be covered and pillows should never be used. This can also cause suffocation.”

Also, stuffed animals, pillows, bumper pads or other fluffy items should not be placed in baby’s sleeping areas.

“There have been numerous reports of suffocation from accidentally covering the baby’s mouth and nose with these items. The baby’s crib should contain nothing but the crib.”

Maruyama also suggests parents not dress baby too warmly at sleep time.

“Allowing babies to become too warmly dressed has been shown to be a risk factor for SIDS. Avoid extra clothing especially when the baby has a fever.”

For the best newborn sleep when putting infants to bed or down for a nap, experts on whattoexpect.com advise keeping babies’ rooms cool. They say being too warm or too cold can interrupt newborn sleep.

“Dress baby in a warm sleeper or sleep sack, but skip the blankets (loose bedding is also a risk factor for SIDS),” says the “How to Dress a Newborn” article. “In the winter, try to keep the room temperature between 68ºF and 72ºF. 68ºF is usually ideal, but all babies are different. If yours wakes during the night or after a nap, check his neck to make sure he’s not too sweaty. A little dampness goes with the baby territory, but pools of perspiration definitely do not.”

Many baby experts suggest a cotton onesie under well-fitting footie pajamas or long-sleeved sleep-and-play outfits as ideal winter sleep wear. Adding a sleeveless sleep sack ensures a safe-sleeping environment, and keep baby warm without blankets.
New Jammies Whales
Show Us the Love

February is American Heart Month, and New Jammies is celebrating heart health and wellness by asking kids and their parents to show their PJ love. Throughout the month, we’re accepting entries for the “Show New Jammies Your PJ Love” contest, open to New Jammies customers and their families who can show kids wearing their favorite New Jammies PJs for infants, toddlers and young children.

Photos can be submitted online by clicking here (or visit newjammies.com and click on “Photo Contest” at the bottom of the page). Deadline for entries is Feb. 29, 2016.

The winner receives 3 pair of PJs or footies of their choice (Value approximately $100.00).

– See more at: http://newjammies.com/blog/show-new-jammies-your-pj-love/

Sleep Tight: Family Sleep Goals for the New Year

New Jammies Sleep SackAs New Jammies winds down after the holidays, we welcome a new year of learning, adventure, discovery and fun.

Not to mention plenty of sleep to get us through our busy days.

As the calendar advances to 2016, we’ve set some goals we think might be easier to achieve if our New Jammies friends are joining in the challenge. From infants to adults, we all appreciate a good night’s sleep. These New Year’s resolutions will help sleep dream’s come true in 2016, friends!

Tune Out to Zone Out at Night

Young and old, beware of the effects of electronics use at nighttime. According to the National Sleep Foundation (NSF), robust scientific data documenting the role of light in promoting wakefulness is stressing the point that electronics and sleep really don’t mix.

“Signaling of light and dark helps us to be alert in the morning and be able to fall asleep at the appropriate time at night,” reports the NSF. “Careful studies have shown that even our small electronic devices emit sufficient light to miscue the brain and promote wakefulness. As adults we are subject to these influences and our children are particularly susceptible.”

The Foundation suggests that many children are not fulfilling basic sleep requirements and adequate sleep is essential for growth, learning, mood, creativity and weight control. Solutions, and in this case new year’s resolutions, include less TV in the bedroom and electronic media, including watching Internet videos and using social media, before bedtime.

“Understanding the influence of light and evening engagement on sleep is the first step in helping parents address the dilemma of electronics in the bedroom,” according to the NSF.

Eat Right to Sleep Tight

Studies consistently prove that better nutrition equals better overall health. Including how well we sleep. So it only makes sense to eat foods that help us get some proper ZZZs. The website health.com suggests including these nutrients in your diet for better sleep each night:

GrapefruitLycopene, found in grapefruit, tomatoes, papaya and watermelon.

Selenium, in fish such as halibut, tuna and cod, as well as shellfish, barley, turkey and nuts.

Vitamin C, from fruits such as pineapple, strawberries, papaya, and citrus, and veggies such as bell peppers, broccoli, and kale.

Carbohydrates, in cereal, rice, potatoes or white bread. Health.com reports that a study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition said eating easily digested carbs four hours before bedtime led people to fall asleep faster.

Quit Bad Habits to Improve Sleep Hygiene

Losing weight. Eating better. Quitting smoking. New Year’s resolutions can sound like a broken record, but for many adults who can’t shake their bad habits, and even kids battling childhood obesity, the struggle is real. And many bad habits lead to poor sleep hygiene, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines as the promotion of good sleep habits and regular sleep. We encourage kids and adults to get outside and play for a healthy exercise regimen that encourages best sleep practices. Both the CDC and the National Sleep Foundation agree that the following sleep hygiene tips can be used to improve sleep:

New Jammies Football• Go to bed at the same time each night and rise at the same time each morning.

• Avoid large meals before bedtime.

• Avoid caffeine and alcohol close to bedtime.

• Avoid nicotine.

These all sound like achievable New Year’s resolutions that can lead to better sleep and a healthy 2016.

Happy New Year from New Jammies!

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New Jammies Butterfly Magic Sleep SackSleep sacks are where it’s at!

Keep your little ones crib safe while they snooze with our study and comfortable New Jammies double-layered sleep sacks. They’re great over footies in the winter months and onesies in warmer weather. New Jammies sleep sacks promote safety while encouraging infants to sleep on their backs and keep babies warm without loose blankets in the crib for the prevention of SIDS. Offered in a plethora of colors and age-appropriate sizes, our 100% organic cotton sleep sacks are breathable to prevent overheating. A great way to start off the new year in comfort and safety!

Click here to shop online

Sleep Tight: Tips for New Moms on Helping Baby Sleep

New Jammies WhalesAt New Jammies, we know that all babies need sleep. In fact, they spend at least 50 percent of their time doing so. Newborns sleep when they’re not being fed, changed and nurtured, so it’s important they’re as comfortable and safe (see our sleep sacks collection) as possible when doing so.

The National Sleep Foundation suggests it’s best to put newborn babies to bed when they are sleepy, but not asleep.

“They are more likely to fall asleep quickly and eventually learn how to get themselves to sleep,” the NSF says. “When infants are put to bed drowsy but not asleep, they are more likely to become ‘self- soothers’ which enables them to fall asleep independently at bedtime and put themselves back to sleep during the night. Those who have become accustomed to parental assistance at bedtime often become ‘signalers’ and cry for their parents to help them return to sleep during the night.”

The NSF says newborns can be encouraged to sleep less during the day by exposing them to light and noise, and by playing more with them in the daytime. “As evening approaches, the environment can be quieter and dimmer with less activity.” The foundation also offers these sleep tips for newborns:

• Observe baby’s sleep patterns and identify signs of sleepiness.
• Put baby in the crib when drowsy, not asleep.
• Place baby to sleep on his/her back with face and head clear of blankets and other soft items.
• Encourage nighttime sleep.

Baby’s sleep patterns for ages 4-11 months can change as eating schedules adapt and social and developmental issues arise. The NSF says by six months, nighttime feedings are usually unnecessary and many infants sleep through the night; 70-80 percent will do so by nine months of age.

“Infants typically sleep 9-12 hours during the night and take 30 minute to two-hour naps, one to four times a day – fewer as they reach age one,” the NSF says. “Secure infants who are attached to their caregiver may have less sleep problems, but some may also be reluctant to give up this engagement for sleep. During the second half of the year, infants may also experience separation anxiety. Illness and increased motor development may also disrupt sleep.”

The Baby Sleep Site

Along with nonprofits that offer advice on baby’s sleep including the NSF, the March of Dimes and more, the experts at babysleepsite.com, provide information on sleep methods, scheduling routines, and baby’s development needs. Nicole Johnson, owner of the Baby Sleep Site and a senior baby sleep consultant, started an Internet-based message board and later a website to offer e-books, articles, a blog, and customized sleep consulting.
“I overcame my son’s sleeping issues in a way that matched my own parenting style, and knew it was my mission to help other tired parents ‘find their child’s sleep,'” she says. ”

The site provides free e-Book Sleep Guides, available at http://www.babysleepsite.com/free-baby-sleep-books. After entering an email address, download the top 15 sleep tips, five ways to help your child sleep through the night, seven secrets to better naps, and how to help your toddler sleep better. Each of the free e-Books come with a blank sample sleep plan.

Bedtime Sleep App

Johnson's Bedtime baby appFor those parents and caregivers who utilize their smart phones and tablets to track and monitor baby’s development, the Johnson’s Bedtime baby sleep app is a convenient tool. Log babies’ daily sleep habits, including how long they sleep and when they’re awake. Records of baby’s sleep log can be stored and shared with your pediatrician. Also, sleep questions can be answered by experts and they can get advice from baby sleep expert Dr. Jodi Mindell on sleep-related topics such as nap time, before bed, and night wakings.

The app also allows users to create their own mix of ambient sounds and baby lullabies to a playlist. A timer automatically quiets the device, and there’s also a dimmer for nighttime viewing.

On the Johnson’s Baby YouTube channel, parents can watch videos on the clinically proven Johnson’s 3-Step Routine, which involves a warm bath, soothing massage and quiet activity.

Safe sleeping with New Jammies

Sleep SacksNew Jammies double-layered sleep sacks are perfect over a onesie for warm nights or with footies for cooler evenings. Sleep sacks encourage infants to sleep on their backs and keep babies warm without loose blankets in the crib for the prevention of SIDS.

Made with 100% organic cotton, New Jammies sleep sacks are breathable to prevent overheating, and come in a variety of sizes and designs. We hope you love them as much as we do!

Sleep Tight: New Spring Styles in Kids Sleepwear

At New Jammies, spring is a season for renewed spirit. At a time when flowers begin budding and birds return to chirping, we reveal new styles and collections of our 100% organic pajamas to excited kids at bedtime.

This spring, bright colors and fun prints comprise our new styles. Flowers, bugs, butterflies, foxes and pirates with updated designs in blues, yellows, oranges and pinks make for fun Easter basket gift ideas. Pack New Jammies in suitcases for comfortable Spring Break travel and fun overnights at grandma’s house.

There are many styles to choose from to get kids excited about bedtime and help infants sleep tight at night:

New Jammies Sleep Sacks

• Our new double-layered sleep sacks are perfect over a onesie for warm nights or with New Jammies footies for cooler evenings. Made with 100% organic cotton, New Jammies sleep sacks are breathable to prevent overheating, and come in our Classic Stripes, Butterfly Magic and Sports Color Block designs. Sleep sacks encourage infants to sleep on their backs and keep babies warm without loose blankets in the crib for the prevention of SIDS. “As a new parent, as well as owner and designer at New Jammies, I’ve found sleep sacks to be an indispensable part of my little one’s bedtime wardrobe,” Nicole Ludlow says. “We couldn’t wait to share them with your little ones this spring.”

New Jammies Butterfly Magic Sleep Sack

• Celebrate spring with one of our pretty new designs in hot pink and white, Butterfly Magic, featured in our new sleep sacks, as well as pajamas, short sets and toddler footies.

• Kids will flourish like a flower after waking up in our Ottoman Flowers pajamas, footies and short sets. The bright aquamarine blue and hot pink hues combine for an electric color combination kids will love as they embrace spring and head into summer.

• Our Bug’s Life New Jammies are comfy and cozy for little science buffs. Blue, orange and yellow create a fun landscape for these soft, 100%% organic pajamas, footies and short sets.

• Nature lovers will enjoy our Sly Fox collection of pajamas, footies and short sets in purple, pink, blue, green and orange.

• It’s Shark Week every day with New Jammies Sharks collection. These blue and gold pajamas, footies and short sets are a fun way to celebrate one of the ocean’s most mesmerizing creatures.

• It’s a pirate’s life for kids with New Jammies’ Pirate’s Ocean, Sail Away Pink and Sail Away Blue collections. These can be great for bed and nap time or for festive pirate-themed birthday parties, all the rage these days.

New Jammies Sports Color Block Short Set• Score big with your little sports fan with our new Sports Color Block collection for spring. These white, blue and gold New Jammies are offered in organic cotton pajamas, footies for babies and toddlers, short sets and sleep sacks.

We are thrilled to share our new spring styles with your families and continue to carry our popular classic summer prints: Lobsters, Whales, Crabs ‘N Stripes, and Classic Stripes.