Eat Right: Healthy for the Holidays!

Holiday meals are full of New Jammies’ traditional favorites, from turkey and stuffing to pumpkin pie topped with fresh whipped cream. With many of these holiday appetizers, entrees and desserts loaded with fat and calories, we like to discover some of the more healthier options for families, especially those with kiddos to please.   

One way to start thinking healthy for the holidays is to consider switching out traditional ingredients for less sugar- and calorie-heavy items. Everyday Health healthy living newsletter offers these options, featured in its “11 Healthy Holiday Food Swaps” article. These include skipping:

• Full-fat dips, and eat yogurt dips (hummus with yogurt and lemon recipe)

• Some alcohol calories, drink wine spritzer instead (8 ‘skinny’ holiday cocktails)

• Candied yams, eat roasted sweet potatoes (low-calorie candied yams recipe)

• Store-bought, eat homemade stuffing (low-calorie stuffing)

• Traditional gravy, eat low-fat gravy (click here for recipe from the Mayo Clinic)

These recipes will be a hit with the family this holiday, and help with staying healthy:

We discovered this healthy mama on instagram with a new low carb twist on stuffing.

Cauliflower Stuffing

“It’s really pretty simple: melt 4T butter, sauté 1 chopped onion. Add 2 chopped carrots and 2 ribs of diced celery and sauté till soft. Add about 3 cups of riced or finely diced cauliflower and cook about 8 min. Add 1cup chopped mushrooms and season with salt, pepper, 1/2 t dry sage, fresh parsley and fresh rosemary. Cover and cook 15 min. Add up to 1/2 c broth if it seems dry. Using frozen cauliflower rice brings more moisture. Serve warm and eat it up!!!”

Thanks  Jennifer!  https://www.instagram.com/jenniferpantall/

 

 

 

 

Wild Rice with Cranberries & Almonds

This low-calorie (120 per 1/2 cup), low-cholesterol (0 mg) side dish, courtesy of the American Diabetes Association’s Recipes for Living, is a healthful holiday option that can be made for a big dinner, or a small get-together with lots of leftovers, as it serves 11. According to the ADA, wild rice takes longer to cook than other rice, but it has a lower glycemic index of 45 compared to white rice with a glycemic index of 70. This is important for those holiday guests with diabetes or other special diet considerations. The toasted almond slices and dried cranberries are a nice touch for any holiday spread.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 small onion, diced
3 1/2 cups water
1 cup fat-free, reduced sodium chicken broth
2 (4-ounce) boxes wild rice
1/3 cup slivered almonds, toasted
1/3 cup dried cranberries

Instructions
1. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 3-4 minutes.

2. Add the water and chicken broth to the pan and bring to a boil.

3. Add the rice; cover and cook according to package directions; usually about 50-60 minutes.

4. Remove the lid and add in the toasted almonds and cranberries; use a fork to mix together.

MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Confirm all ingredients are gluten-free, including the chicken broth, and this can be made gluten-free.

Butternut Squash Soup

Roasted Butternut Squash Soup

Finally we found Jenn, a veggie lovin’ mama, cooking up Roasted Butternut Squash Soup which she considers a cold-weather staple! We love this silky butternut soup served with spicy roasted chickpeas for extra flavor. Vegan, Vegetarian, and T-Rex toppings available, so there’s something for everyone!

Recipe yields approx. 4 bowls or 6-7 cups of soup.

COURSE SOUP
CUISINE AMERICAN
KEYWORD ROASTED BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP
PREP TIME 10 MINUTES
COOK TIME 50 MINUTES
TOTAL TIME 1 HOUR
SERVINGS 6 SERVINGS
AUTHOR JENN LAUGHLIN – PEAS AND CRAYONS

Ingredients

  • 2.5 lb butternut squash
  • 3 large carrots
  • 1 onion (white or yellow)
  • 1 TBSP avocado oil (or favorite healthy oil)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 TBSP unsalted butter
  • 3 cloves garlic smashed + minced
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • additional salt + pepper to taste

SPICY ROASTED CHICKPEAS

  • 15 oz canned chickpeas
  • 1 TBSP avocado oil (or favorite healthy oil)
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1/4 tsp ground cayenne pepper (spiiicy!)
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/8 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F. Make sure you have two large rimmed baking sheets handy as well as a blender.

  2. Drain and rinse your chickpeas and place on a stack of paper towels to dry a bit. The drier the chickpeas the crispier they’ll get in the oven. Woot!

  3. Cut your squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Pierce skin of squash a few times with a knife. Peel and cut your carrots into 3 portions. Peel onion and cut into 8 quarters.

  4. Place your squash (cut side down), carrot, and onion on a large rimmed baking sheet (or roasting pan). Drizzle with 1 TBSP oil (extra if desired) and season with 1/2 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper. Pour 1/4 cup of water over the squash. (it will evaporate as the squash roasts)

  5. Pat chickpeas dry and add to your second baking sheet. Drizzle with 1 TBSP oil and season with 1/4 tsp salt. (The rest of the spices will be added after)

  6. Place both pans on the center rack in your oven and roast. Chickpeas will be done at 30 minutes and the squash and veggies will be done after 45-55 minutes. When squash is tender and can be removed from the skin easily with a spoon it’s good to go!

  7. While your veggies roast, combine spicy chickpea seasoning in a small bowl: paprika, cayenne, garlic powder, cumin, black pepper. Set aside and once chickpeas are done roasting, sprinkle with the seasoning blend, mix ’em up, and set aside. They will crisp up more as they cool!

  8. In a medium-large pot, melt 2 TBSP butter over medium heat. For extra flavor, let’s brown the butter first to add some nutty flavor to our soup! Let your butter melt untouched, then once it starts to simmer and brown, add minced garlic and whisk constantly until butter is golden and fragrant. Add your vegetable broth, cover, and reduce heat to low.

  9. Once your squash is ready, allow to cool enough t handle, then peel off the skin of the butternut. Alternatively you can scoop the squash out with a spoon.

  10. Working in batches, blend the veggies with the broth in your blender until silky. I was able to add half the veggies and half the broth and get it all blended in 2 batches. Filling blender only 2/3 full is best as hot liquid expands.

  11. Return the soup to your pot and mix well. Add any additional seasoning to taste and feel free to add extras like nutmeg, allspice, cayenne pepper, etc… If skipping the chickpeas (which have a LOT of flavor) you’ll want to add extra seasoning to the soup. Keep covered over lowest heat setting until ready to serve.

  12. Dive in while it’s hot and top soup with seasoned chickpeas and your choice of toppings from the notes below. I like mine with chickpeas, scallions and a teeny drizzle of cream!

    Visit Jenn for more topping and spice ideas for your bowl!   This might be bookmark worthy –  Peas and Crayons 

Wishing you a happy, healthy holiday season!!

New Jammies was born as an environmentally responsible company offering 100% certified organic cotton and flame retardant-free children’s pajamas. Learn more at newjammies.com.

Eat Right: Healthy Holiday Recipes for the Whole Family

Holiday meals are full of New Jammies’ traditional favorites, from turkey and stuffing to pumpkin pie topped with fresh whipped cream. With many of these holiday appetizers, entrees and desserts loaded with fat and calories, we like to discover some of the more healthier options for families, especially those with kiddos to please.

One way to start thinking healthy for the holidays is to consider switching out traditional ingredients for less sugar- and calorie-heavy items. Everyday Health healthy living newsletter offers these options, featured in its “11 Healthy Holiday Food Swaps” article. These include skipping:

• Full-fat dips, and eat yogurt dips (hummus with yogurt and lemon recipe)

• Some alcohol calories, drink wine spritzer instead (8 ‘skinny’ holiday cocktails)

• Candied yams, eat roasted sweet potatoes (low-calorie candied yams recipe)

• Store-bought, eat homemade stuffing (low-calorie stuffing)

• Traditional gravy, eat low-fat gravy (click here for recipe from the Mayo Clinic)

These recipes will be a hit with the family this holiday, and help with staying healthy:

Spinach Parmesan White Bean Dip

Found on Pinterest, one of our favorite resources for ideas for healthy recipes and fun holiday do-it-yourself projects, this simple, vegetarian, five-ingredient, gluten-free dip is “packed with protein and veggies, and tons of cheesy flavor.” Sounds great to us!

Ingredients
1 cup baby spinach, packed
1 15 oz. can white beans, small
2 tbsp freshly squeeze lemon juice
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese

Instructions

1. Blend in food processor; salt and pepper to taste.

2. Serve with carrots, celery, cauliflower, pita chips or any healthy chip or veggie stick that goes great with dips.

 

Wild Rice with Cranberries & Almonds

This low-calorie (120 per 1/2 cup), low-cholesterol (0 mg) side dish, courtesy of the American Diabetes Association’s Recipes for Living, is a healthful holiday option that can be made for a big dinner, or a small get-together with lots of leftovers, as it serves 11. According to the ADA, wild rice takes longer to cook than other rice, but it has a lower glycemic index of 45 compared to white rice with a glycemic index of 70. This is important for those holiday guests with diabetes or other special diet considerations. The toasted almond slices and dried cranberries are a nice touch for any holiday spread.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 small onion, diced
3 1/2 cups water
1 cup fat-free, reduced sodium chicken broth
2 (4-ounce) boxes wild rice
1/3 cup slivered almonds, toasted
1/3 cup dried cranberries

Instructions
1. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 3-4 minutes.

2. Add the water and chicken broth to the pan and bring to a boil.

3. Add the rice; cover and cook according to package directions; usually about 50-60 minutes.

4. Remove the lid and add in the toasted almonds and cranberries; use a fork to mix together.

MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Confirm all ingredients are gluten-free, including the chicken broth, and this can be made gluten-free.

 

Orange Glazed Turkey with Potatoes & Carrots

The American Heart Association offers many healthy options for traditional recipes on its website at recipes.heart.org. This citrus-roasted recipe for a turkey breast, to make holiday prep easier, caught our eye for a healthy take on festive meals.

”Try this new Simple Cooking with Heart take on traditional turkey. Its seasoning gives the dish a base of flavor, and orange marmalade adds tangy sweetness. Serve with potatoes and carrots. Enjoy the taste of Thanksgiving year-round!”

Ingredients
6 Servings
Nonstick cooking spray
1.5-1.75 lb. boneless, skinless turkey breast (all visible fat discarded)
2 tsp. dried mixed herbs (mix a combination of any/all – rosemary, basil, parsley, tarragon, chives, thyme, sage)
3/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
3 Tbsp. orange marmalade
1 lb. washed potatoes (can use any type of potatoes), cut into 1-inch pieces
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
4 medium carrots (peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces)

Instructions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

2. Spray a 9×13 inch casserole dish with cooking spray. Place turkey in the dish.

3. In a small bowl, mix dry ingredients (herbs, salt, pepper, garlic powder). Rub half of mixture over the turkey.

4. Spread marmalade over turkey.

5. Stir potatoes, carrots and oil in to remaining herb mixture. Place vegetables in dish around the turkey. Bake for 1 hour.

6. Remove from oven and let sit 5-10 minutes to allow juices to redistribute.

 

Spiced Caramel Apples

Better Homes and Gardens knows a little something about entertaining, and has spent decades being one of the foremost experts on food. So it’s no surprise they’ve put together a list of Healthy Apple Desserts that includes this easy recipe that slow cooks while everyone is visiting.

“Instead of serving caramel apples on a stick, we cut apples in half, topped them with a sprinkle of cinnamon and cloves, and cooked them in a slow cooker. We added a drizzle of caramel topping later, along with a few chopped pecans, to create a healthy apple dessert that wows.”

Ingredients

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
5 medium red-skinned cooking apples (such as Rome or Jonathan), cored, and halved
1/2 cup apple juice or apple cider
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2/3 cup sugar-free caramel ice cream topping
1/2 cup toasted, chopped pecans

Instructions
1. In a small bowl, combine cinnamon and cloves. Core and halve the apples.

2. Place 1/2 of the apple halves in a 3 1/2- to 4-quart slow cooker. Sprinkle evenly with some of the cinnamon mixture. Add remaining apples and sprinkle with remaining cinnamon mixture.

3. Pour apple juice and lemon juice over apples. Stir to coat apples evenly.

4. Cover and cook on low-heat setting for 2-1/2 to 3 hours, stirring gently halfway through cooking time.

5. Spoon apples and cooking liquid to individual serving dishes. Drizzle with caramel topping and sprinkle with pecans.

 

New Jammies was born as an environmentally responsible company offering 100% certified organic cotton and flame retardant-free children’s pajamas. Learn more at newjammies.com.

Play Right: Fall Crafting for the Kids

At New Jammies, we love the beauty that Autumn brings, from the changing of the leaves to the colors of the harvest. So this season the time is right to let the kids become inspired by all that surrounds them to make fun crafts with a Fall theme at home.

New Jammies Founder and CEO Nicole Ludlow loved the Halloween-inspired Paper Plate Spiders her preschool-aged son made at school, with inspiration from the I Heart Crafty Things blog. We thought we would check out other do-it-yourself crafts young children can complete from iheartcraftythings.com, and these Cupcake Liner Turkey Puppets caught our eye.

Just in time to get into the Thanksgiving spirit!

Turkey Time

“I love making crafts with my kids that can be interactive for pretend play or that we can use to reenact a story that we’ve just read. I came across some darling Cereal Box Turkeys over at Plum Pudding recently and I loved them,” says the iheartcraftythings founder and kids craft designer Rachel Nipper. “I decided to make more of a kid-friendly version that my children could help me with and we are using them as Turkey Puppets. We used one of my favorite crafting materials to make them also, cupcake liners.”

Supplies:

• craft stick [We received ours from our friends at Craftprojectideas.com.]
• 2 mini brown cupcake liners
• 1 orange cupcake liner
• sheet of cardstock paper (I used a scrap piece of yellow, you can use whatever color you want)
• small piece of brown, yellow and red cardstock paper
• 2-inch circle punch (or you can free hand a circle this size)
• school glue
• glue stick
• scissors

Directions:
1. Start by using your glue stick to glue down your orange cupcake liner onto a sheet of cardstock paper. I used a scrap piece of yellow that I had. You can choose whatever color you want to use. Now cut the cupcake liner out. (Backing it with cardstock paper gives the cupcake liner and puppet stability.)

2. Use school glue to glue your craft stick down to the front of your orange cupcake liner.

3. Using your glue stick, glue one of your mini brown cupcake liners onto the orange cupcake liner, positioning it at the bottom.

4. Use your scissors to make slits around the top and sides of your orange cupcake liner. Some of the cardstock paper you glued your cupcake liner onto may show through after doing this, so keep that in mind when deciding what color you use in step 1.

5. Cut your other mini brown cupcake liner in half and glue the pieces onto the sides of your other brown cupcake liner to act as turkey wings.

6. Cut a 2-inch circle from your circle punch out of your brown paper and then glue it onto your puppet.

7. Finish your turkey by adding googly eyes, a beak and snood cut out of your red and yellow paper.

“Now you have a fun little turkey puppet to reenact your favorite turkey story or for imaginative, pretend play. We made several turkeys so my kids have had fun letting them interact with each other,” Rachel says. “I think it would also be fun to play around with different patterned cupcake liners instead of the orange one. I’m thinking orange polka-dot liners or a different pattern. I didn’t have any on hand to try it out.”

Sponge Paint It

Nicole also noticed her preschooler seems to be drawn to painting with sponges, so she became inspired to ignite his creativity at home using household sponges and paint.

“I just cut up a sponge into different shapes and put colors of paint on plate to dip and splotch, she says.

At school, he made this Egg Carton Caterpillar project in class, and it turned out pretty cute, according to Nicole.

“All you need for this project is an egg carton, some kid-friendly paint, pipe cleaners and eyes (optional, because you can always just paint the eyes on),” says Megan Bray, from the Balancing Home blog site.

Read full instructions here.

Catch the Sun

Nicole says another neat project her son did at school, but parents and caregivers can also do at home, is making suncatchers or stainglass.

“Cut a shape out of thin tissue paper and paint with water colors,” she says.

The Artful Parent blog offers 50+ suncatcher crafts for kids at https://artfulparent.com/stained-glass-suncatcher-ideas-kids.

These Autumn Leaf Suncatchers from The Artful Parent are great as holiday presents in December or gifts for the family at Thanksgiving in November.

Supplies:

• Transparent contact paper (sticky-back plastic)
• Fresh autumn leaves
• Heart or other hole punch (optional)

Directions:

1. Cut off a rectangular piece of contact paper. Fold it in half, then pull the paper covering off to the fold, exposing half of the sticky plastic.

2. Arrange your autumn leaves on the sticky contact paper and press to adhere.

3. If desired, your your hole punch to cut out heart (or other) shapes from leaves and add those to the suncatcher as well.

4. When you are satisfied with your design, remove the rest of the paper backing from the contact paper. Carefully fold it over the leaves, sandwiching them in between the two layers of plastic, and press down with your hands, avoiding air bubbles if possible.

5. Hang in a sunny window and admire!

The Artful Parent taped the suncatchers to the window, but sometimes they punch holes in the top and add a ribbon for hanging.

A note about the leaves: The fresh autumn leaves are beautiful, vibrant, and full of color which is one of the reasons we like to use them for these nature suncatchers every year (rather than pressed and dried autumn leaves). However, please note that they will lose some of their color over time and decay. Ours are usually enjoyed for about two weeks before we take them down.

For more fun DIY arts and crafts activities ideas from The Artful Parent, click here.

Happy crafting!

New Jammies was born as an environmentally responsible company offering 100% certified organic cotton and flame retardant-free children’s pajamas. Learn more at newjammies.com.

 

Play Right: Fall Games Using Found Objects

Football New Jammies

Football New Jammies

Autumn is a perfect season to get outside, and New Jammies can’t think of a better time to explore and find the fun than fall. Hiking, camping, fishing and leaf peeping are just a few fun family-friendly activities to enjoy in the crisp air surrounded by nature. Even when wearing  your organic cotton New Jammies pajamas!

Playing outside can also motivate kids to invent new games and expand their imaginations with found items. From pumpkins grown in the family garden to pine cones found on a day hike, nature’s bounty can make playing games fun and creative this fall.

Check out these cute ideas for an Autumn to remember:

Pine Cone Toss

The toddlerapproved.com website, a resource for parents and teachers of young children that helps foster a love of learning at an early age, has many craft and activities ideas for kids. Their Pine Cone Toss game helps parents work with their kids on hand-eye coordination and counting. Here are the easy steps for fun play using pine cones form the woods or backyard.

Materials needed:
1. Six pine cones in a variety of sizes
2. Three varying sized bowls
3. One die
4. Tape to mark off the playing area

Pine Cone TossHow to play:
1. Put bowls out in order from big to small (small is harder and further away) and designate each bowl to have a certain number of points. We kept it simple and had the big bowl be worth 1 point, next bowl worth 2 points, and third (harder) bowl worth 3 points.

2. Roll the die and count the number shown on the die. (ex. 3)

3. Toss that number of pine cones into the bowls to try and earn the most points (ex. toss 3 pinecones into the bowls). Over time your child will learn that throwing three into the furthest small bowl will earn more points than throwing all three into the first big bowl.

4. Count up your points (and write them down to keep track).

5. Take the pine cones out of the bowls and pass the pine cones and die to the next person.

6. Take turns until everyone has had a turn. Play again and again until you are bored. Decide to play until the first person gets to 10 or 20 points if you want to have a designated ending point.

Pumpkin Ring Toss

The Pumpkin Ring Toss game can be played by trying to throw rings over the stems, or the pumpkins themselves.

Materials needed:
1. A grouping of 3 or more pumpkins with long stems — the straighter the better
2. Large metal mason jar bands (without lids), rope rings or other pliable, smaller rings to toss
3. Something to mark lines to stand behind

How to play:
1. Players are given 3 rings to try and ring as many pumpkin stems as possible.

2. We recommend parents and kids try it out for difficulty before playing. If the game is too easy, move your lines farther back, if the game is too hard, move lines closer.

3. Take turns throwing one or two times per player.

4. The player with the most rings around the pumpkins wins.

Autumn Leaf ObstacleAutumn Obstacle Course

The National Wildlife Federation is known for being a voice for wildlife, dedicated to protecting wildlife and habitat and inspiring the future generation of conservationists. So the nonprofit knows first-hand how to teach kids to also have fun while learning when they’re out there in the wild, wonderful outdoors. On its website nsf.org, the nonprofit hosts a section for Family Fun, with nature-friendly activities and games for kids and parents to do together. This Autumn Obstacle Course is perfect for utilizing the leaves raked in the yard for teachable moments:

Materials needed:
1. Paper grocery bags
2. 3 bean bags (optional)
3. A yard full of leaves
4. Rakes

How to play:
1. Design a course by deciding where to build a course, what shape it will take, and obstacles, including: Pile of leaves to crawl through. Bags of eaves to leap over. Paper grocery bags that must be filled with leaves before continuing on. Stations where your child must find three bean bags (or other objects) buried in a leaf pile. And a huge pile of leaves to dive into as the grand finale.

2. Rake leaves to make an obstacle course (you’ll need leaves, lots of them). Give your child a small rake so he or she can help collect the leaves you’ll need. Then arrange the leaves into the obstacle course you designed earlier. (For two kids who want to race, make two identical courses.)

3. Race through the course. Ready, set, go! Now it’s time to have fun. Race with your child or referee two kids racing. Or time your child as he or she runs the course. Change the obstacles to keep the fun going.

4. Talk about autumn and leaves. Fall into the season. Tell your child autumn has another name — fall. Ask if he or she can guess where the name came from. Explain it refers to the time of year when the leaves on some trees turn color and “fall” off. Why do leaves change color? Explain that leaves are green because they contain chlorophyll, a substance that helps plants make food. In fall, leaves stop making chlorophyll, and their green color fades. That’s when other colors underneath — the beautiful yellows, reds and oranges of fall — can show through. Ask your child to guess the most common leaf color (Answer: yellow.)

5. Fall recycling. Help your child discover ways that nature reuses old leaves. Overturn a bunch of leaves that have been on the ground for a while. You’re likely to find insects and other creatures. That’s because leaves provide these animals with food and shelter. Look for leaves from last year, and show your child how the old leaves have begun to decay. Explain that these old, rotten leaves enrich the soil, supplying food so other plants can grow.

Happy Autumn, and give thanks this November!

New Jammies was born as an environmentally responsible company offering 100% certified organic cotton and flame retardant-free children’s pajamas. Learn more at newjammies.com.

Eat Right: Healthy Pumpkin, Squash Recipes for Fall

PumpkinThis fall, New Jammies parents took note of a viral social media rumor about the contents in canned pumpkin pie filling used religiously at the holidays that had people talking. Many were shocked to learn the canned stuff is secretly butternut squash.

Oh, the humanity.

The snopes.com urban legend reference confirmed the rumor as true. “As much of 90 percent of pumpkin sold in the U.S. (and 85 percent worldwide) is a proprietary cultivar known as a Dickinson pumpkin, which are less photogenic than the type of pumpkins commonly used for display purposes,” Snopes reported.

The good news is pumpkin is a cultivar of the squash plant, so their nutritional values have similarities. Pumpkin and squash varieties, including butternut, acorn and spaghetti, are superfoods perfect for healthy fall recipes.

Pumpkin seeds — great for roasting, lightly seasoned, then snacking on — contain 1.7 grams of dietary fiber per ounce. Mashed pumpkin is high in fiber, with 3 grams, and low in calories, at 50 calories per cup. Pumpkin and squash boost vision, lower blood pressure, help with sleep, and promote heart health.

New Jammies loves sharing in the bounty of fall by eating well and teaching our children the benefits of healthy fruits and vegetables. These recipes will keep pumpkin and squash on the grocery list all autumn long. Happy harvest!

Pumpkin muffinsBest Ever Pumpkin Muffins
cookingwithmykid.com

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 8-10 minutes
Makes 30-35 mini muffins

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups flour
3/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
pinch of salt
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1 can 100% pure pumpkin
2 large eggs lightly beaten
1/2 cup canola oil or vegetable oil
1/3 cup lowfat Greek yogurt

Instructions
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Spray mini muffin tins with cooking spray.
Mix flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, pumpkin pie spice and salt in large bowl.
In a separate bowl whisk together pumpkin, eggs, oil, and yogurt.
Combine wet and dry ingredients until just blended.
Spoon batter into muffin tins. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean.
Transfer muffins to rack to cool.

Acorn SquashMashed Acorn Squash
wellnessmama.com

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 45 minutes
Serves: 4-6

This simple and flavorful roasted acorn squash mash with a hint of coconut oil or butter and real salt.

Ingredients
2 medium size acorn squash
¼ cup butter or coconut oil
2 teaspoons real salt (or other natural salt)
Other spices (optional) Cinnamon, nutmeg, and garlic are good but not needed.

Instructions
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Slice squash in half and scoop out seeds. Place face down in a large baking dish and add about ½ inch of water.
Bake for 30-45 minutes (depending on size of the squash) until the skin is easy to pierce with a fork and the flesh is soft.
Remove from oven and scoop out the flesh of the squash.
Place in bowl and add coconut oil/butter and salt.
Serve as you would mashed potatoes or sweet potatoes and enjoy.

PumpkinHealthy Pumpkin Pie Custard
www.sugarfreemom.com

This pumpkin dessert is gluten-free and low-carb. Add in some golden raisins for a healthy, chewy twist.

Ingredients
1 can (15 ounce) pumpkin purée
1/2 cup heavy cream
4 beaten eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 teaspoons pumpkin spice
1 teaspoon pumpkin spice liquid stevia or vanilla liquid stevia or even cinnamon stevia
Optional toppings: Dairy Free Whipped Cream, Sprinkle of nutmeg

Instructions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Spray 6 ramekins or custard cups with olive oil cooking spray.
In a large bowl or stand mixer mix together pumpkin, cream eggs, spices and stevia.
Pour evenly into ramekins.
Bake for 45-50 minutes or until a knife in center comes out clean


New Jammies was born as an environmentally responsible company offering 100% certified organic cotton and flame retardant-free children’s pajamas. Learn more at newjammies.com.

Play Right: Celebrate National Wilderness Month Outdoors

ColoradoBoyAs New Jammies welcomes the change of seasons, National Wilderness Month is the perfect time for families to get outside and explore.

The Federal Facilities of Environmental Stewardship suggests celebrating America’s wilderness in September, and throughout Autumn, by visiting the nation’s wilderness areas and learning about the issues facing these pristine environments. In his Presidential Proclamation of National Wilderness Month in September, President Barack Obama, agreed.

“I invite all Americans to visit and enjoy our wilderness areas, to learn about their vast history, and to aid in the protection of our precious national treasures,” he proclaimed.

The country’s vast wilderness areas provide acres-upon-acres of natural playground for kids and parents to hike, fish, camp, boat, birdwatch, sightsee, and numerous other ways to enjoy the Great Outdoors. The country’s preserved spaces were protected 52 years ago when the Wilderness Act was passed, marking the beginning of an era when Americans were empowered by Congress to propose protection of special wild places, watersheds, wildlife habitat and outstanding recreational opportunities such as hunting, fishing, camping and hiking.

“The law immediately set aside approximately nine million acres of U.S. national forests as wilderness, defining the highest level of protection, uses and enjoyment of these federal lands,” said the Wilderness Society, founded in 1935 to advocate for protection of America’s roadless wild places.

“Today the National Wilderness Preservation System encompasses nearly 110 million acres of wild country in 44 states and includes lands in national parks, forests, wildlife refuges and Bureau of Land Management areas.”

In 2014, when the Wilderness Act celebrated 50 years, Wilderness Society President Jamie Williams expressed the importance of protection of our wilderness areas.

“Today we need wilderness more than ever,” Williams said. “In an urban nation, we need a place to get away, to enjoy and restore ourselves. The people who wrote the Wilderness Act called it an essential human need, and that’s why they wrote the Wilderness Act – to protect wild places for all of us, and for our quality of life. There’s one constant since the Wilderness Act was passed – people want to protect more of our wild places, which define us as a nation. They are our American legacy, something we can leave to future generations.”

New JammiesOutdoor gear company REI offers its tips on camping in the wilderness with the younger set, providing the opportunity for priceless family memories for New Jammies kids. To start, REI says to prepare for outdoor overnight trips by practicing camping at home.

“If your kids are outdoor newbies, pitch a tent in the backyard or even inside your home. Let them hang out in it and sleep in it so they become comfortable with a new sleeping environment,” said the company, which donates percentages of its sales to conservation efforts.

“Take a trial run: Before your overnighter, try a family day outing at a close-to-home park. Spend a half-day or so at a lakeshore or park and see how your kids react to the experience. Take notes: Write down reminders for future trips: ‘Pack more sunscreen.’ ‘Bring long pants.’ ‘Leave bongos home.'”

REI also suggests these fun items to bring along on camping trips with kids:

• Paddleball set
• Marshmallow launcher
• Animal-shaped flashlights
• Kits, discs and flying toys — REI’s faves include glowing, multicolor LED flying discs and Djubi balls
• Low-tech fun with a boot-around plastic ball that doubles as an ice cream maker
• Water toys to cool off
• Foot bags
• Educational games, including “Pass the Pigs” and “Why Knot?”

Most of all, New Jammies hopes kids get outside and have fun in the beauty and wonderment of the nation’s beloved wilderness areas as the leaves change.

New Jammies was born as an environmentally responsible company offering 100% certified organic cotton and flame retardant-free children’s pajamas. New Jammies are WRAP certified for socially responsible manufacturing practices, created in GOTS certified knit, print, and dye facilities, and made of OE100 100% certified organic cotton. Learn more at newjammies.com.

Eat Right: Healthy Fall Recipes for Football Season

Football FieldNew Jammies celebrates the start to the football season each fall with playful designs for the tiniest of fans. Our navy-and-kelly-green Football Field collection is always a fan favorite. And this autumn, we’ve introduced the fun Football Tough design for a new twist on our gridiron action prints.

With every new football season also comes the chance to try new tailgating recipes. And New Jammies found these healthy alternatives to game-day snacks that will make football fans of all ages happy:

Oven-roasted CauliflowerOven-roasted Cauliflower Bites with Cilantro Yogurt Dip
Courtesy Simply Organic

Simply Organic organic spices, seasonings, and baking flavors provides this spicy oven-roasted cauliflower recipe featuring freshly grated ginger and organic turmeric for a golden texture perfect for fall. This easy Greek yogurt sauce with green onions, cilantro and garlic adds a burst of cool flavors.

Cauliflower
1 large head of caulilfower
2 tablespoons extra light olive oil, plus more for the pan
2 tablespoons melted butter
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger root
1 teaspoon Simply Organic Turmeric
1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon Simply Organic Red Pepper Flakes
1/2 teaspoon Frontier Sea Salt
1/4 teaspoon Frontier Organic Black Pepper
Juice from half a lemon

Dip
1 cup Greek yogurt
2 whole green onions, minced
1/4 cup minced fresh cilantro
3/4 teaspoon Frontier Sea Salt
1/2 teaspoon Simply Organic Garlic Powder

Directions
1. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees and lightly oil a rimmed, aluminum baking sheet.
2. In a medium bowl combine the Greek yogurt, minced green onions, cilantro, garlic powder and salt. Stir to combine; cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve.
3. Meanwhile, in a large bowl combine the oil, butter, ginger, turmeric, red pepper flakes, black pepper, salt and the juice from half a lemon. Whisk to combine.
4. Cut the cauliflower into bite size pieces (not too small) and toss them in the spicy ginger-turmeric dressing until evenly coated.
5. Scatter the cauliflower on the lightly oiled baking sheet and slide them into your preheated oven. Roast the cauliflower for 20 to 25 minutes until golden, rotating the pan halfway through. Do not toss or flip the cauliflower or you will not achieve a good caramelization.
6. Once the cauliflower has finished roasting, let it cool for 5 minutes before serving.a

Avocado BruschettaBruschetta with California Avocado and Basil
Courtesy California Avocado

Whip up these fresh and savory bite-size snacks from California Avocado. Place the thin slices of avocado on the toasted bread first so the tomato-avocado mixture stays on the bread better and is deliciously moist. If you prefer a drier bruschetta, omit half the avocado. Also try the tomato-avocado mixture over pasta, rice, grilled chicken or beef. Serves 8.

Ingredients
1 to 2 ripe Fresh California Avocados, seeded and peeled
1/2 lb. Roma tomatoes, sliced lengthwise and diced
1/4 cup diced red onion
2 Tbsp. olive oil
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh basil leaves, plus additional for garnish
1 to 2 medium cloves garlic, minced
As needed freshly ground pepper and salt, to taste
1 sourdough baguette (about 10 oz.), diagonally cut into 1/2-inch slices and lightly toasted

Directions
Thinly slice half of the avocados, then cut the slices in half crosswise. Reserve.
Dice the remaining avocado.
In medium bowl, lightly combine the diced avocado, tomatoes, onion, olive oil, basil, garlic, pepper and salt.
Top each slice of toasted bread with 2 or 3 of the reserved avocado slices. Top with about 1 heaping Tbsp. of the tomato-avocado mixture.
Garnish each with small leaf of basil, if desired.

Green ChilesTex-Mex Squash Casserole
Courtesy Mountain Harvest Organics

Mountain Harvest Organics is an organic farm based in the Appalachian Mountains whose website, mountainharvestorganic.com, features a blog about the farm-to-table lifestyle and a section with recipes. From Swiss Chard and White Bean Stew to this quick-and-easy Tex-Mex Squash Casserole and a sweet oatmeal Pear Crisp, there’s an abundance of options for healthy fall eats on the inspirational site.

Ingredients
2 small yellow squash, sliced
1 teaspoon cumin
2 small zucchini, sliced
4 ounces green chilies, chopped
1 medium onion, sliced
2 cups yellow corn
1 teaspoon garlic, minced
1/2 cup cheddar, grated
2 tablespoons oil
1/2 cup Monterey jack, grated

Directions
Lightly sauté the squash, zucchini, onion, and garlic until just soft. Toss with the remaining ingredients.
Place in a lightly oiled 2-quart casserole dish.
Bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. Serve warm.

Pear Crisp
Courtesy Mountain Harvest Organics

Ingredients
6-7 pears
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
2/3 cup oatmeal
3/4 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup butter
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Slice pears and combine with 1/4 cup of the brown sugar, lemon juice and raisins. (The brown sugar is optional and used to sweeten the fruit some. The raisins are also optional).
2. Combine flour, oats, 1/2 cup of brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt together in bowl. Cut butter in with the dry ingredients until mixture is crumbly.
3. Cover bottom of buttered cake pan with fruit mixture (square 8 inch pan that holds 6 cups). Sprinkle flour/oat topping over fruit and bake for 30 minutes. Serve warm, plain or with whipped cream or vanilla bean ice cream.

PumpkinPumpkin Cookies
Courtesy EatingWell

Those familiar tastes of fall, cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice, make for a rich and flavorful pumpkin cookie to top off any game-day tailgating spread. These cookies are packed with Vitamin A in the pumpkin puree — a 1-cup serving contains more than seven times the daily value — which is great for vision, a healthy immune system, and proper functioning of the heart, lungs and kidneys. And the cup of raisins provide fiber, vitamins, minerals and poly-phenol antioxidants. Makes enough for a football team at 3 1/2 dozen cookies.

Ingredients
3/4 cup canned organic pumpkin puree
3/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup nonfat plain yogurt
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup raisins
2 cups sifted cake flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Directions
Position rack in the center of the oven and preheat oven to 350°F. Line baking sheets with parchment paper or coat with cooking spray.
Whisk together pumpkin, sugar, yogurt, oil and vanilla in a large bowl until smooth. Stir in raisins. Stir together flour, cinnamon, ginger, baking soda, salt, allspice and nutmeg in a medium bowl. Stir the dry ingredients into the wet with a wooden spoon, mixing just until just blended.
Drop the batter by tablespoonfuls onto a prepared baking sheet, spacing cookies about 1 1/2 inches apart. Bake until lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Transfer cookies to a wire rack and let cool.

Sleep Tight: Meditation for a Better Sleep

New JammiesAt New Jammies, we all know how important sleep is for a healthy lifestyle. Without it, sleep can be a detriment to how we function at home, work, and school. With it, sleep can improve our moods, stress levels, and productivity.

In short, bring on the sleep.

Sleep isn’t always easy for parents, and especially kids, to achieve at bedtime, though. For some, a good night’s sleep takes work. A diet rich with Vitamin B6, calcium, potassium and less caffeine can help. Meditation and relaxation exercises also aid in achieving healthy sleep.

“One of the most powerful techniques for quieting the mind is meditation, which allows you to go beyond the mind’s noisy internal dialog into a space of silence and stillness,” says Deepak Chopra, M.D., on his Chopra Centered Lifestyle website www.chopra.com.

The Chopra Center suggests committing to a consistent sleep ritual by creating a soothing evening routine. Take a light walk shortly after dinnertime and minimize intense mental activity in the evening. Prepare for bed about an hour before sleep by running a hot bath and performing a slow, oil massage on your body.

“Put a few drops of lavender oil in the bath water and play some soothing music. Have the intention to allow the stress of the day to leave your body,” Chopra says. “Once you’ve completed your bath, try drinking a warm herbal tea or heated milk with a pinch of nutmeg.”

The Chopra Centered Lifestyle says the ideal bedtime is 10 p.m. Once in bed, try and avoid watching television or reading mentally stimulating material and spiritual or inspirational literature to help shift your awareness away from the usual demands of your life to a more expanded perspective.

“Avoid work on your taxes, balance your checkbook, or watch a violent thriller on television right before bedtime – all of these activities can over stimulate the Vata dosha and make it hard to fall asleep. Turn off the lights, close your eyes and just lie comfortably on your back observing your breath. Allow your attention to float through your body. If you notice areas of tension, consciously release the pressure,” Chopra says.

See more at: http://www.chopra.com/ccl/5-tips-to-end-insomnia-and-get-restful-sleep#sthash.cdkF6kwd.dpuf

Sleep Meditations for KidsKids can also benefit from sleep mediation, especially in today’s age of apps available to help soothe them to sleep. The free Sleep Meditations for Kids Android app on Google Play, created by leading yoga teacher and Montessori teacher Christiane Kerr for children of all ages, helps guides kids to the creative part of their minds through a number of carefully scripted story meditations.

“Each meditation story has an underlay of subtle sound effects and gentle music which combined with Christiane’s calming voice make them irresistible and a deeply relaxing. This recording will help children to relax and will enhance feelings of contentment. It can be used for a general relaxation, or as a teaching resource and is suitable for children up to the age of 12,” says the app’s description.

The app features a deeply relaxing 13-minute audio track and Kerr’s calm, reassuring voice that guides children, as well as adults, into a completely relaxed state of mind and body. She founded Calm For Kids children’s yoga and mindfulness training in 1999. She has has been practicing and teaching yoga for over 15 years in the UK and offers training, CDs and free mp3s on her website at calmforkids.com.

The Rabbit Who Wants To Fall AsleepIn August, fortune.com featured a children’s sleep aid in the form of a book by Swedish author and psychologist Carl-Johan Forssen Ehrlin that’s on the top Amazon’s best-selling book. The article says “The Rabbit Who Wants To Fall Asleep” is like hypnosis for children, and “will put your kid to sleep in minutes.” In the kid’s book, Roger the Rabbit and friends Sleep Snail and Uncle Yawn try to help him find sleep.

“This is a new safe and innovative way to help your child fall asleep and is recommended by psychologists and therapists,” says the review on Amazon. “‘The Rabbit Who Wants To Fall Asleep’ will help you accomplish the task of getting your child to have its beauty sleep and sleep well all night.”

The book is available in five formats: Hardcover, Paperback, Kindle, Audible or Audio CD.

New Jammies sleep fashions for fall help kids rest easy

Space Cadets

This fall, New Jammies is helping kids relax right and sleep tight at bedtime with comfortable, all-organic new designs that reflect the changing season.

Fashionable fall collections for girls and boys include Unicorns, Bicycles, Ballerinas, Elephants, Trains, Monster Trucks, Space Cadets, Moose Tracks, Rainbow Unicorns, and Ranching Cowboys. New Jammies are 100% organic cotton, are not treated with flame retardants, and feature tagless labels for comfort.

For example, nature-loving boys or girls can be ready for bedtime in the popular Moose Tracks prints, back this season in soft sage green with stretchy rib knit. Our Space Cadets collection explores the galaxy in this whimsical organic cotton footie pajamas. The whimsical Elephant Kites organic cotton pajama set will send girls off to dreamland in cozy, comfort.

Visit newjammies.com here to shop online this fall.

Play Right: After-School Activities to Help Kids Focus

Now that New Jammies kids are back in the swing of school, focus is a key to helping them achieve high marks and perform well in class. After-school can be an important time of the day for kids to not only relax and play, but also work on focusing on schoolwork.

Let’s Get Physical
Exercise is a great way for kids to fight childhood obesity (September is Childhood Obesity Awareness Month) and stay mind-sharp. The experts at WebMD agree.

“Physical activity boosts blood flow all over the body, including to the brain. Brain cells get better at connecting with each another,” says WebMD author R. Morgan Griffin in “Your Kid’s Brain on Exercise. “What’s the result? Better thinking skills.”

WebMD says studies show that people who exercise more are sharper mentally.

“The effects may be almost immediate. One study found that kids scored higher on math and reading comprehension tests after exercising for 20 minutes,” says the report.

Griffin suggests helping kids benefit from after-school activity with an hour of exercise a day. “That’s what the CDC recommends for kids ages 6 to 18. Your kids can split up activity over the course of the day. A few minutes here and there adds up.”

footballThe CDC offers age-appropriate* ideas for physical activity for children and adolescents, at least 3 days per week as part of your child’s 60-or-more minutes, such as:

1. Moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, or vigorous-intensity activity, such as running.

2. Muscle strengthening activities, such as gymnastics or push-ups.

3. Bone strengthening activities, such as jumping rope or running.

*Per the CDC, some physical activity is better-suited for children than adolescents. For example, children do not usually need formal muscle-strengthening programs, such as lifting weights. Younger children usually strengthen their muscles when they do gymnastics, play on a jungle gym or climb trees. As children grow older and become adolescents, they may start structured weight programs. For example, they may do these types of programs along with their football or basketball team practice.

Exercise the Brain
Check out the interactive website goofybrains.com, a division of Brain Pages, which specializes in the ethical and honest promotion of brain health and mental  health products, resources and professionals. The site offers ideas to keep kids’ minds sharp in its “Six Brain Exercises For Children” feature by Sarah Holt, a writer for increasebrainpower.com.

She suggests word searches and crosswords, memory exercises, and obstacle courses for the brain with stations set up hosting different focus-building activities. Holt also encourages parents and caregivers try having kids write or draw left-handed (or right-handed).

“This can be fun to see who can tell what was written or drawn afterwards. Another option is to draw a picture where one-half is done with the dominant hand and then afterwards it is copied onto the other half by the non-dominant hand. These are brain exercises for children that encourage both sides of their brain to work together,” she says.

Thank you, Internet

Image courtesy puzzlestoprint.com

From puzzles-to-print.com

The puzzles-to-print.com website is a helpful resource for parents and caregivers who have the ability to print off pdfs of word scrambles as educational tools and after-school activities to build focus.

Make the mind games fun for the holidays by printing off holiday-themed puzzles including this puzzle, just in time for Halloween. Click here to print out the fun.

Fall into Fun
Autumn is closing in, so while the weather is still warm, encourage New Jammies kids to play outside after being inside in the classroom all day. The website Kids Activities (www.kidsactivities.net), which provides “1,000s of ideas for childcare professionals and teachers,” offers these ideas, and more, for autumn after-school activities:

gourds1. Gourd Bowling. Set up bowling pins using empty two-liter soda bottles. If preferred, the bottles can be weighted with seeds or water. Use a round, bumpy gourd as the ball.

2. Magic Pumpkin Seeds. Materials: Pumpkin seeds, small paper bag and small pumpkins. Show the children a small bag of pumpkin seeds and explain that you believe these are magic pumpkin seeds. Take the children outside to your yard where they toss the seeds onto the ground. Have them make up a few magic words, if they want. The next day, before children go outside — gather the seeds and put small pumpkins in their place. Take the children outside and delight them with the ‘magical’ pumpkins that have grown. If you have enough pumpkins, the children can take the pumpkins home and/or first decorate and paint them to add to theme of your space. Idea adapted from preschoolrainbow.org.

3. The Squirrel Game. Let the kids pretend they are squirrels gathering nuts for the winter. Give each a small paper bag, then toss out several unshelled nuts onto the floor and let the kids race to see who can collect the most. Older and younger children should be separated for this game. Another way to play this game, (if you have a way to corral a large quantity of leaves) is to hide nuts beneath a large pile of leaves and give the kids a set amount of time to find as many nuts as they can.

4. Visit http://www.kidactivities.net/category/Seasonal-FallAutumn-Games.aspx for more fun fall game ideas.

Sleep Tight: Sending Kids Back to School Well-Rested

imageAs New Jammies kids head back to school, sleep is a major component to making sure they’re alert and ready to take on the day. For starters, we suggest a good night’s sleep and a healthy diet of fruits and veggies.

There are also many suggestions from experts on how to help send kids back to school well-rested. According to Prevea Health Services in Green Bay, Wisconsin, summer can change a child’s sleep schedule dramatically.

“During the summer, going to bed late and sleeping in late can become normal for kids. Two to three weeks before school starts, ease your children back into a more school-friendly sleep routine with consistent bedtimes. Encourage them to gradually start going to bed earlier and waking up earlier to help them better transition/’ says the healthcare organization, on its website. “The start of the school year can be very challenging when children are not well rested, so make sure to practice good sleep habits.”

Previa also suggests not allowing TVs in children’s bedrooms, turning off other electronics or cell phones at least 30 minutes before lights out, limiting caffeine during the day and discouraging any leading up to bedtime. Parents can also follow these suggestions for themselves and lead by example.

“These are valuable tips for parents, too,” Previa says. “It’s helpful to set a good example for kids to follow.”

Allowing for enough time to sleep is important when preparing for back-to-school. The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) says school-aged kids, 6-13 years old, need 9-11 hours of sleep, especially as they become involved in additional school activities.

“At the same time, there is an increasing demand on their time from school (e.g., homework), sports and other extracurricular and social activities,” says the NSF. “In addition, school-aged children become more interested in TV, computers, the media and Internet as well as caffeine products – all of which can lead to difficulty falling asleep, nightmares and disruptions to their sleep.”

The National Sleep Foundation reminds parents that in particular, watching TV close to bedtime is associated with bedtime resistance, difficulty falling asleep, anxiety around sleeping.

Preschoolers (3-5 years) typically sleep 11-13 hours each night and most do not nap after five years of age.

“As with toddlers, difficulty falling asleep and waking up during the night are common. With further development of imagination, preschoolers commonly experience nighttime fears and nightmares. In addition, sleepwalking and sleep terrors peak during preschool years,” says the National Sleep Foundation.

The foundation’s sleep tips for preschoolers suggests parents make sure to:

• Maintain a regular and consistent sleep schedule.
• Have a relaxing bedtime routine that ends in the room where the child sleeps.
• Have a child sleep in the same sleeping environment every night, in a room that is cool, quiet and dark – and without a TV.

The website www.sleepforkids.org is a service of the National Sleep Foundation that teaches the importance of sleep to kids. Through the site, parents can order the informative booklet “Time to Sleep with P.J. Bear,” which uses an illustrated story to teach children about sleep. The website also includes a Games and Puzzles section where kids can have fun while learning about sleep. They can see how much sleep time they get by calculating their bedtime and test their memories with the Sleep Card Game. They can also print out the “Bring Out the Stars” activity page that features P.J. Bear.

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New Jammies appShop Right

This school year, New Jammies is making shopping for back-to-school sleepwear easier with our new mobile site and shopping app. New Jammies wants to make shopping online for kid’s PJs, footies, sleep sacks and more a breeze for our on-the-go customers. Go to your smart phone or tablet’s App Store and search for New Jammies to download our new shopping app for iPhone and Android. And visit our updated mobile shopping website at www.newjammies.com to shop our 100% organic cotton pajamas on the go!